Beauty bag

Whether you’re gearing up for a spot of sweaty yoga or a calorie-blasting cardio class, high intensity exercise does a great job at making you feel amazing. But, your hair and skin can often look less than gorgeous post-workout, leaving you in need of some serious freshening up.

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When it comes to your gym beauty bag, you’re pushed for both space and time, but having the right products can make all the difference. The solution? Simplify your pre- and post-exercise beauty regime with essentials that promise to work just as hard as you do, and in half the time.

Skyn Iceland, Glacial Cleansing Cloths, £13, Cult Beauty

It’s important to cleanse your skin before and after a workout in order to prevent clogged pores and breakouts, but busting out your full cleansing routine at the gym just isn’t going to happen.

Instead, invest in some ultra-delicate cleansing cloths that will help to detoxify your skin on-the-go. We love Skyn

How the latest technology can help you get salon

Given that we’re more clued up about our beauty regimes than ever before, it’s no wonder the smart technology once only available in the salon has finally evolved for clever, at-home use. From gel nails to laser hair removal, armed with the knowledge – and now the tools – to achieve professional results for a fraction of the cost and in a lot less time, more and more of us our tackling a range of treatments from the comfort of our own home.

A new survey conducted by Braun Beauty has found that 66 per cent of us are forgoing salons for the DIY approach as appointments are too expensive – with half saying the price takes away our enjoyment of a salon trip. In fact, 97 per cent of women revealed they could save up to £1,200 a year by doing their beauty maintenance themselves. And with 69 per cent of those polled seeing salon treatments as a luxury, spurred on by the possible savings, it’s no surprise so many are taking back control of their beauty regimes.

Dress power player

François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of Kering, the French luxury conglomerate that owns Gucci, Saint Laurent and Brioni, wore a stretched-out zip-up hoodie. So did Mark Pincus, the founder of Zynga. Ron Meyer, vice chairman of NBCUniversal, wore a Mr. Rogers black cardigan and baggy black shorts. Ivanka Trump wore an oversize white shirt, untucked, and skinny jeans. Omid Kordestani, executive chairman of Twitter, wore a Patagonia puffer. Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, wore skinny cargo pants and a cardigan the color of dried mud.

These were some of the outfits modeled at that ultimate showcase of mogul leisure wear formally known as the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference 2017 and more colloquially called “summer camp for billionaires.” It may have ended Sunday, but its style preferences will resonate throughout the rest of the season.

If you want to know how to dress down like a power player during the coming vacation period, there is no better case study, thanks to the distillation of

Christopher Kane

Inspired by his SS17 collection, the new version of the clog style shoe are tiger print and embellished with an ostrich feather, floral Jibbitz adornments and Christopher Kane’s signature ‘K’.

Available in four trend-led colourways – you can choose between honey, avocado, ochre and black.Setting you back £64.99, this style are over £100 cheaper than the originals from his SS17 collection.

 

‘They are brilliant for summer, as they are so comfortable and cooling. That they look great is an added bonus. I’ve always been a fan of the iconic Crocs Clog. I like that they are perceived by some to be quite ‘ugly’ and not at all feminine or designed to flatter. They are designed for function, and that’s what attracted me to them,’ Kane commented.

If Kane has managed to convince you of their style kudos you can pick them up at Office, Topshop, Selfridges and more.

READ MORE: Can Christopher Kane Make Crocs Cool?

READ MORE: The Most Beautiful Dresses From Paris Couture Fashion Week

READ MORE: All Hail Celine Dion, Queen Of Paris Couture Week

The clothes are just irrelevant’

A candid interview in which British Vogue’s former fashion director said she was fired from the title has been mysteriously removed from the internet.

Ever since the announcement that long-standing editor Alexandra Shulman was to be replaced by stylist Edward Enninful, it became clear that a new era was dawning at the glossy title. Especially as two other departures swiftly followed: managing editor of 24 years Frances Bentley left on the same day, and fashion director Lucinda Chambers announced that she was to step down four months later.

But now, in an extremely open interview with Vestoj, Chambers has said that she was fired – a decision which she said took bosses just “three minutes” to carry out.

In an article published on the “critical thinking” fashion website, Chambers, 57, said she had been fired six weeks ago by Enninful.

“A month and a half ago I was fired from Vogue,” she says. “It took them three minutes to do it. I didn’t leave. I was fired.”

British Vogue has since responded, saying: “It’s usual for an incoming editor to make some changes to the team,” the publication told The Independent.

“Any changes made are done with the full knowledge of senior management.”

The interview

The childhood favourite is anything but juvenile

With summer comes the usual seasonal hairstyles – think tousled beach waves, slick ponytails and breezy braids. But this time round these looks are set to be finished off with perhaps the most stellar of hair accessories: the oversized bow.

If the last time you wore a bow in your hair it cast a flashback to butterfly clips and Velcro shoes, then it’s time to rethink how you dress up your tresses because this look is no longer reserved just for the toddler set.

Now, you’re never too old to we

Why lace-up shoes are summer’s most sultry trend

Believe it or not this trend isn’t really anything new. Back in 2013 Celine’s Autumn/Winter 2013 ads saw model Daria Werbowy sport an insouciantly tied bow in her dishevelled bun that complimented the oversized feel of the collection.

It was playful, sharp and anything but juvenile.

Fast forward four years and the elaborate use of bows has re-enterted the fashion landscape with Dolce & Gabbana, once again, proving that they do hair accessories better than anyone else.

For Spring/Summer 2017, the fashion house sat a stack of social media stars and millennial influencers front row – Lionel Ritchie’s daughter, Sofia and Jude Law’s son, Rafferty among them. But

While classic fabric

While classic fabric staples like cotton, linen and silk will no doubt be on the agenda this summer there is another, somewhat unlikely, textile trending both on and off the runway – tulle.

Traditionally reserved for wedding veils and tutus, the tulle takeover is in full swing. But forget frills and flounce because for 2017, the ballerina staple has had a high fashion makeover.

Across the board, designers interpreted the fabric in two very different ways – romantic and rebellious – pairing the delicate material with everything from oriental florals to sportswear and slogan t-shirts.

Now, to discuss tulle without first acknowledging the so-called Molly Goddard effect would be ludicrous. After all, the young London-based designer has championed the fabric ever since her first show back in Spring/Summer 2014.

Goddard always rises to the occasion and having built a brand on frou-frou party dresses, her latest offering did not disappoint.

Here, she cited New York’s underground club scene as her typically saccharine girls headed for an all-night rave. There were neon tulle dresses worn with t-shirts featuring photography by Nick Waplington, giant fluro-green crinoline skirts and sheer netted gowns cut asymmetrically at both the neck and the hem.

Bag Trending Now

From Beyoncé and Amal Clooney to Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Amanda Seyfried, 2017 has been the year of the celebrity pregnancy, and it has had an interesting knock-on effect when it comes to fashion.

According to global fashion search platform, Lyst, global searches for ‘diaper bag’ are up 74% compared to this time last year.

It seems a growing number of new mums are taking their cue from the celebrities and investing in designer diaper bags.

Lyst reported a 40% increase in designer diaper carriers styles across their 12,000 partner retailers, and the average diaper bag now sells for a whopping £405.
While all the big names – including Burberry, Versace and Moschino – cater to this market, there is one brand that is leading the way. It is, of course, Gucci. Gucci’s diaper bag was the most viewed bag on Lyst last week (w/c 3rd July).

Hardly suprising considering the bag looks nothing like a traditional diaper bag. Complete with the GG printed pattern and a chic leather trim, the French Fashion house haven’t forgotten about the sensible details- it comes with bottle pockets and a fold-out changing mat. Available in two sizes, you

Fashion kids

A cursory glance at the fashion statement of celebrity kids tells you that street fashion is here to stay even among this age group, says Sweta Kumari.

One look at photographs of Harper Beckham, Suri Cruise or Dannielynn Birkhead who modelled for Guess and you know that street fashion is not a passing fad. Children, as much as youth, breathe it.

Street style for kids is big business today. Funky, quirky and jazzed up with glamour accessories team up with the carefully casual look for girls and boys.

Street style has always been there. It is only since the mid-1950s that its importance has been recognised, appreciated and emulated. Street fashion is considered to have emerged not from studios, but from the grassroots. It is generally linked with youth culture, and is often seen in major urban centres even though smaller towns have their own smaller hubs.

Theories about origin of street fashion

The Trickle Up Theory involves innovation or a picky style that begins on the streets, worn by lower income groups. It is picked up by designers and projected to upper class spheres which purchase the designs.

A typical example of this is the T-shirt. From a modest start, the Tee has turned into

The boyband staple

The latest in a long line of 90s comebacks – think belly-baring crop tops, chokers and Calvin Klein undies – hair highlights for men are in the midst of a revival.

Once considered a boyband staple, ‘frosted tips’, more commonly known as ‘guylights,’ were the look du jour for some of the most eligible men of the moment – we’re looking at you, Justin Timberlake – but recently, they’ve been cropping up all over the place.

And, what’s even more surprising is that we don’t particularly hate it

Saddle up with cowboy-inspired menswear this season

Similar to highlights, this style is achieved by bleaching just the ends of hair strands, leaving the impression that one’s hair has been ‘frosted.’

Most recently, the look has been adopted by the likes of Chris Evans on the cover of L’Uomo Vogue, John Mayer, Niall Horan and YouTube sensation Alfie Deyes.

But just because it looks good on them doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll suit you.

Instead of looking directly to 90s heartthrobs for inspiration, stylists believe that the highlight resurgence is a reaction to more severe hair trends that have dominated for the past few years such as grey, platinum and structured barbershop locks.“For a while, everything was bold and demanded

The clothes are just irrelevant

A candid interview in which British Vogue’s former fashion director said she was fired from the title has been mysteriously removed from the internet.

Ever since the announcement that long-standing editor Alexandra Shulman was to be replaced by stylist Edward Enninful, it became clear that a new era was dawning at the glossy title. Especially as two other departures swiftly followed: managing editor of 24 years Frances Bentley left on the same day, and fashion director Lucinda Chambers announced that she was to step down four months later.

But now, in an extremely open interview with Vestoj, Chambers has said that she was fired – a decision which she said took bosses just “three minutes” to carry out.

In an article published on the “critical thinking” fashion website, Chambers, 57, said she had been fired six weeks ago by Enninful.

“A month and a half ago I was fired from Vogue,” she says. “It took them three minutes to do it. I didn’t leave. I was fired.”

British Vogue has since responded, saying: “It’s usual for an incoming editor to make some changes to the team,” the publication told The Independent.

“Any